Homophobia and Transphobia Survey Summary

Create on: 16 May 2012 at 03:05 AM

Homophobia and transphobia are defined as a range of negative attitudes and feelings towards homosexuality and transgenderism. These phobias also affect people who are identified as or perceived as being homosexual and transgender, respectively. These negative attitudes may include antipathy, contempt, prejudice, aversion, and irrational fear of homosexuals and/or transgender people. Being a minority population, some members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) community in Singapore may have experienced homophobia or transphobia in their lives.

 

Oogachaga Counselling and Support (Oogachaga) is Singapore's only community-based organisation providing counselling and support for the LGBTQ community.

 

In March 2012, Oogachaga conducted it first survey on homophobia and transphobia, titled “Impact of Homophobia and Transphobia on the LGBTQ individuals in Singapore”. It is also the first Singapore-based survey that is conducted to understand the possible relations between homophobic and transphobic experiences, and behavioural issues and suicidal ideations in the LGBTQ community.

 

We are pleased to release the summary report of this survey on 17 May 2012, which is the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia. 


 

Key findings

The survey received overwhelming response from the community with more than 450 completed responses.

 

The survey presented the following key findings:

a. 60.2% of the respondents indicated they have had experiences with sexual orientation and/or gender identity-based abuse and discrimination. Transgender females have the highest incidence rate (94.4%), followed by males (62.5%);


b. The most common forms of abuse or discrimination faced by LGBTQ individuals are homophobic jokes and being called by derogatory names;


c. Most respondents have experienced sexual orientation and/or gender identity-based abuse and discrimination in schools and from the general heterosexual population;


d. LGBTQ individuals who have had experiences with sexual orientation and/or gender identity-based abuse and discrimination, reported a significantly higher incidence rate of self reported behavioural issues;


e. LGBTQ individuals, who have had experiences with sexual orientation and/or gender identity-based abuse and discrimination, reported a significantly higher incidence rate of having suicidal thoughts or attempts.


 

By releasing this summary report, Oogachaga wants to raise the awareness among the following population:

 

a. LGBTQ community:

  • Many LGBTQ individuals face homophobic and transphobic abuse and discrimination from others. It is important that LGBTQ individuals adopt positive coping strategies while the LGBTQ groups and individuals work together to reduce the incidence of discrimination.

  • There are many LGBTQ resources available that LGBTQ individuals who are struggling with these issues can seek help and support from. 


b. Helping professionals in the social service, healthcare and mental health care sectors:

  • The homophobic and transphobic abuse and discrimination faced by their LGBTQ clients and its direct or indirect consequences on their clients’ mental well being.

  • Professionals and volunteers in these sectors can play a more active role in reducing the incidence of discrimination and in supporting their LGBTQ clients and patients.


c. Professionals in the education sector:

  • Homophobic and transphobic abuse and discrimination are pressing issues faced by LGBTQ students.

  • Educators, supporting staff and students can play a more active role in addressing these discrimination in schools and in supporting their LGBTQ students and classmates.

 

Click here to download the full summary report (PDF 548kb) 


We acknowledge that given the nature of the online survey, the findings from this survey may not be representative of the whole LGBTQ community nor has it covered all aspects of homophobic and transphobic situations in Singapore. We will plan to conduct a more comprehensive study in this area.

 

If you are keen to participate in a study that is related to this survey or get more updates
from Oogachaga Counselling and Support, please subscribe to our mailing list on http://www.oogachaga.com/congregaytion/users/letter

 

If you have any recommendation to this report or the survey, please contact us at contact@oogachaga.com.


We need your financial support in our work for the LGBTQ community in Singapore, please consider to make a small cash donation on https://www.give.sg/org/OurSpaces

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